Hutton Settlement Annual Tree Farm Fundraiser!

It’s that time of year!


All proceeds from Hutton’s tree farm go directly back to our on-campus educational programs. Our community has been an incredible support year after year – thank you!!


We hope you have a happy holiday season.


Hutton Kids Give Back

This week, a group of our Hutton children and staff helped out the Spokane’s 300 Boodle Brigade with assembling care packages for deployed troops. Thanks to Hutton Board member, Dawn Worrall for letting us be a part of this special evening!


Each year, our kids participate in programs which allow them to give back to the community and by the end of their Senior year, most of them will have completed over 400 hours of voluntary community service!


It is our goal that when a child graduates from Hutton, they are aware of the needs of the community and eager and able to give their services to make change.

Hutton: Full Circle

One of the greatest gifts we can be given at Hutton is having an alumni coming back to work with us. The children we serve are a part of our large family and to have them desire to become an employee brings a great amount of joy. We decided to highlight two of our more recent alumni and had them share their experiences. Emanuel is a new houseparent and Linda is soon going to begin training to become a houseparent.

 

 

WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR BEST MEMORIES FROM YOUR TIME LIVING AT HUTTON?
 

Emanuel: All of the opportunities I was given to travel. I got to to to Mexico my senior year with the Campus Director David, his wife, Tamara, my brother and a fellow Hutton resident. We went there to work with a ministry and help build a house. Seeing what it’s like outside of the U.S. was amazing, and being able to share that with David and Tamara (and the others) made it even more so. I was also a part of the SALUTE club and we got to go to Washington D.C., which was really neat. One of my other favorite memories was my first Christmas at Hutton. I was not expecting much out of Christmas and they filled the decorated dining table with food and treats and gave us presents. It was a really neat experience.

 

Linda: My first weekend visiting Hutton was definitely memorable. I was just trying to figure out how it all worked. One of my favorite memories was my first Christmas, as well. I wasn’t really used to getting a lot of gifts, so it was neat to get presents. I also really enjoyed my graduation and prom season.One of my best memories however, is just seeing how much everyone cared about me after only living there a short time. It was kind of amazing.

 

 

WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO COME BACK AND WORK AT HUTTON?
 

Emanuel: I had known since high school that my dream was to come back and be a houseparent. I didn’t think it’d happen so soon out of college, though. I figured maybe after I had kids and had been married a while, but a position opened up shortly after I graduated from EWU, so I took it. Being in SALUTE taught me to give back and support the community. I wanted to show my appreciation first by graduating college and doing well in school, and then by becoming a houseparent.

 

Linda: I decided to start training because I knew I was a little young to become a houseparent, but knew that I wanted to eventually. Training will offer me a lot of guidance for when I become a houseparent. I want to make a difference. Since I was only at Hutton a year, and had experience (prior to coming here) being on my own and taking care of myself, I feel like I have a lot to offer kids. I have real life experience in the real world at a young age and can help guide them through graduating and being out on their own.

 

 

WHAT’S ONE THING ABOUT HUTTON YOU THINK THE PUBLIC SHOULD KNOW ABOUT, THAT MAKES US UNIQUE?
 

Emanuel: I think SALUTE is amazing. They give so much back to the community and teach the kids the importance of doing so. I got a lot out of being a member of that club and I think it’s great.

 

Linda: How they help the alumni so much after they graduate. We are still family to them and them reach out to us and have get-togethers often. We aren’t just phased out when we turn 18. We always have a home to come back to.

Hutton: Full Circle

Hutton: Full Circle

One of the greatest gifts we can be given at Hutton is having an alumni coming back to work with us. The children we serve are a part of our large family and to have them desire to become an employee brings a great amount of joy. We decided to highlight two of our more recent alumni and had them share their experiences. Emanuel is a new houseparent and Linda is soon going to begin training to become a houseparent.

 

 

WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR BEST MEMORIES FROM YOUR TIME LIVING AT HUTTON?
 

Emanuel: All of the opportunities I was given to travel. I got to to to Mexico my senior year with the Campus Director David, his wife, Tamara, my brother and a fellow Hutton resident. We went there to work with a ministry and help build a house. Seeing what it’s like outside of the U.S. was amazing, and being able to share that with David and Tamara (and the others) made it even more so. I was also a part of the SALUTE club and we got to go to Washington D.C., which was really neat. One of my other favorite memories was my first Christmas at Hutton. I was not expecting much out of Christmas and they filled the decorated dining table with food and treats and gave us presents. It was a really neat experience.

 

Linda: My first weekend visiting Hutton was definitely memorable. I was just trying to figure out how it all worked. One of my favorite memories was my first Christmas, as well. I wasn’t really used to getting a lot of gifts, so it was neat to get presents. I also really enjoyed my graduation and prom season.One of my best memories however, is just seeing how much everyone cared about me after only living there a short time. It was kind of amazing.

 

 

WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO COME BACK AND WORK AT HUTTON?
 

Emanuel: I had known since high school that my dream was to come back and be a houseparent. I didn’t think it’d happen so soon out of college, though. I figured maybe after I had kids and had been married a while, but a position opened up shortly after I graduated from EWU, so I took it. Being in SALUTE taught me to give back and support the community. I wanted to show my appreciation first by graduating college and doing well in school, and then by becoming a houseparent.

 

Linda: I decided to start training because I knew I was a little young to become a houseparent, but knew that I wanted to eventually. Training will offer me a lot of guidance for when I become a houseparent. I want to make a difference. Since I was only at Hutton a year, and had experience (prior to coming here) being on my own and taking care of myself, I feel like I have a lot to offer kids. I have real life experience in the real world at a young age and can help guide them through graduating and being out on their own.

 

 

WHAT’S ONE THING ABOUT HUTTON YOU THINK THE PUBLIC SHOULD KNOW ABOUT, THAT MAKES US UNIQUE?
 

Emanuel: I think SALUTE is amazing. They give so much back to the community and teach the kids the importance of doing so. I got a lot out of being a member of that club and I think it’s great.

 

Linda: How they help the alumni so much after they graduate. We are still family to them and them reach out to us and have get-togethers often. We aren’t just phased out when we turn 18. We always have a home to come back to.

Hutton Life: Reflecting Back

Bob Baker lived at the Hutton Settlement from 1935 – 1942, leaving the home at 16.


We decided to sit down with him and reflect on life at Hutton all those years ago. Mr. Baker has been an engaged alumnus for countless years, including starting the Hutton Scholarship Fund, which has been matched and grown substantially throughout the years, and now has an endowment value of $490,000. He strongly believes in importance of education. We asked him to share his fond memories of Hutton and he began with the story of the menagerie he built behind the barn on the campus. The “barn boss” that worked there helped him build the cages and he spent his free time taking care of his animals in the menagerie, which included pigeons, chickens and rabbits. When asked if he ever got in trouble for doing so, he replied, “No one ever talked to me about it or told me not to. Who’s going to say anything? The barn boss helped me”.


When describing life in the cottage, he stated, “Think about it – we had over 20 boys in that cottage with one woman (Mrs. Barkley) taking care of us. We must have been like a ton of mice.” Baker remembers only one boy in the cottage having a mother outside of Hutton – the rest were all orphaned. One of his fondest memories is of the friendships he made while living at the Settlement. “When you have that many boys living together, you’re friends. You become brothers. I stayed lifelong friends with some of them.”


Baker talks about being barefoot most of the time in the summer and working a lot in the fields. When asked if he remembers being disciplined, he shares a story of sneaking down to the river with a group of the kids to go swimming. They got caught and were brought back. He says now he realizes how dangerous that river is. Baker “left his mark” on Hutton as a child, when a few of the boys climbed into the silos, up a plank that stretched to the roof of the barn (built by some of the kids) and carved their initials 30 feet off the ground in the ventilators. He laughs and explains,


“Wouldn’t you know, I’m claustrophic now!”.


He continues his reflections, describing how the kids were always well-fed and well-clothed. 


They took part in all aspects of working the farm, taking care of the cows, horses, pigs and chickens raised on the campus. “Chickens were a delicacy in my day – not very many people had chickens.” They mowed the lawn with hand mowers and made tunnels in the ground for fun. He emphasizes that living at Hutton taught him how to work hard and be responsible, waking himself up at 4am every morning to milk the cows and take care of them. “There are two things I resent doing in my life”, he says, “leaving Hutton and quitting school when I was 16 and second, smoking cigarettes.”


We asked why he left when he did, and he chuckled and said “heck if I know!”. When he left, he passed down his menagerie to a fellow Hutton kid. He got a job working on a pig farm in Valleyford, WA, then went into construction, harvest work and a bakery before joining the Navy, where he was active for two years during World War II. While in the Navy, Baker says he realized quitting school hadn’t been a smart decision. He began taking GED courses and finished just after getting out of the service. Afterward, he went to WSU for a year on the GI Bill, attending Pre-Veterenarian school, and decided Vet school wasn’t for him, with his lack of a real educational background. He then went back to work in road construction and next in an auto glass and upholstery shop.


While working there, he decided to make use of the GI program again and started back at school at Eastern State College, where he studied to become an Industrial Arts teacher. He opened his own auto upholstery and renovation shop. When he got to the final year of his schooling, the time to do his student teaching, he had grown his business so much that he didn’t have time to finish that final phase.


Since, Baker has grown to be very successful in the business world of Spokane, with multiple businesses in town.


His life has been an incredible journey. He says the whole world has changed since he lived at Hutton, but the most important thing he learned while living there is how to work hard and be responsible. He is very passionate about education, which was his reasoning for starting the Hutton Scholarship fund


Hope & Wholeness: A Parent’s Story

My name is Jobe, I am a proud father of seven beautiful children and it gives me great honor to say that five live in the blessed security of Hutton Settlement. However, this was not always the case. You see my past consisted of me being consumed in addiction and this was wreaking destruction on me and especially my children. This was a hopeless situation for all of us. 


The life-controlling issues that come with addictions don’t just hurt those who are trapped in this lifestyle, but have a ripple effect that negatively touches every person in the addict’s life. I was lost, broken and stripped from being able to properly care for my children. By the grace of God, an intervention came about and my children were taken into custody by Child Protective Services as wards of Washington State. I was scared and headed straight for depression. Then the miracle happened. Family, friends, and Child Protective Services invited me to a family planning meeting. The decision was made to place my children at the Hutton settlement.


Shortly thereafter, I made the life choice to enter Adult and Teen Challenge, a long-term faith-based recovery program where I have been set free from my addictions. I learned the skills to be a productive member in the community and how to apply biblical principles to my life, becoming a father my children have come to love and respect. God opened my eyes to the amazing love and care a family like Hutton provides to children that are in desperate need.

When my children arrived at Hutton they had seen plenty of misfortune and had experienced way more dysfunction then I even would like to admit. Yet, the journey began and Hutton started building structure into their lives. All the while I was in constant communication with the Director of Children and Family Services and houseparents in efforts to build strong relationships with not just my children, but with the very people who where caring for them.

Hutton has been the pivotal part for the reconciliation of my relationships with my children. 

Hutton has proved that a child’s life can never have enough love. I have become part of a greater family unit. Over time, I have built strong relationships with the houseparents and staff and Hutton has extended an open door for me as part of the family. I am able to spend time with my children at events and holidays such as the yearly harvest, Christmas at Hutton, birthdays and get to have one on one time with them. I have been able to take my girls to events like Bloomsday and I take the boys fishing. We spend quality time together and they even come for overnighters with me in my apartment. Hutton’s years of experience and solid foundation continue to fine tune my outlook of what real parenting is and together we
reap the results of doing so, and I love it.


My children are involved in many different activities that challenge them and offer them the opportunity to grow and mature into responsible young people. It brings me great joy as I watch my children playing sports and participating in school programs and other activities. The care and structure that Hutton provides is real and has my children’s best interest at heart. When situations arise in my childrens’ lives, which they do, I get a phone call and am advised of what is going on. I am part of the decision making process in the affairs of my children, reassuring me of my fatherhood. Hutton includes me, helping me to grow into becoming a better father.


I can’t thank Hutton enough for all they have done to aid in my becoming a good father and caring for my children. The love, guidance and nurturing my children have experienced there has been paramount to teaching them what a stable family setting can be. Through Hutton, my children have truly been able to experience their childhood and this is evident every moment that I spend with them. Their happiness, joy and contentment are impossible to hide.

My siblings and I stayed with my grandmother off and on. Sometimes my mother would show up with food, other times she would take us pan handling with her. We would sit on the street corner while she begged for money to feed us. Once she had enough, she would send us into the store to buy food and then make us eat it behind the store. When we were done she would have us come back to the street corner while she continued begging to feed her habit. Nothing was permanent.


We also lived with our grandfather for a short while. Living with my grandpa, I often  walked on egg shells, never knowing when my grandpa would explode in rage. I tip toed, trying not to anger him and spent my days playing with my cousins and siblings and hanging out in the library across the street. My mother showed up one day, with hopes to take my siblings and I away from our grandpa. Only I and my little sister ended up going with her. That first night we spent in a motel. We were awoken in the middle of the night to loud banging on the door, my grandpa had found us and was attempting to break down the door. We climbed out of the back window, climbed under fences and hid under bushes in the rain. The next morning we found that the tires had been slashed. We spent the next several days on the streets, eating at the mission and staying at drug houses.


My mom eventually got us all back and we moved to Spokane, I was 8 years old. Things seemed almost stable for a while. My mom was working even though she was still using drugs and her boyfriend was selling them. But we had a roof over our heads and I had just started third grade. One day at school, my two brothers and I got called to the counselor’s office. She told us that we would not be going home, Children’s Services placed my little sister and I in one foster home and my brothers in a separate home. I found out later that our house had been raided and my mom and her boyfriend were sent to jail. And just like that my whole world had been pulled out from under my feet, I was terrified. For some time my mom was not allowed visitation with my siblings and me. I remember just as school was getting out one day my mom showed up with a bag of toys, my foster parent quickly ushered me in the car and we drove away. I cried, not understanding why I could not see my mom. I prayed every night for God to help my mom get off of drugs and make us a family again.


Eventually, my siblings and I were placed in my grandma’s care. There, we basically had to fend for ourselves. My older brother and I did our best to feed ourselves and our two younger siblings. Our meals consisted of boxed mac n cheese, ramen noodles, and microwaved eggs. I remember on Thanksgiving, my grandpa sent us a pre-made Thanksgiving feast. My brother and I re-heated the food, and my siblings and I had our little Thanksgiving. We always looked forward to the first of the month because my grandma would treat us to dinner at a restaurant or buffet.Though we lived a block from our school, we would often stay home or be sent home because of head lice. Our grandma was ill and was not equipped to care for us. We were again placed in separate foster homes. My older sister and I were placed in one foster home, while my brothers and little sister were placed in another foster home that was out in the country. After my older sister ran away from the foster home we shared, I was placed in yet another home with an older couple. Although, these foster homes provided my siblings and I with the stability we needed, we were missing the emotional comfort of being together. I was alone and missed my brothers and sisters. I poured myself into school work because it was the one thing that I could control. I, eventually, was placed in the foster home in the country with three of my siblings, and transferred to another school. All the while my mom had finished a treatment program near Yakima and was being moved to another treatment program to begin the process of regaining custody. Our CPS worker told my mother about the Hutton Settlement and she fought to get us placed there, at the opposition of our Guardian Ad Litem, grandpa and foster parents, so that we could all be together and be near her.


I was placed at The Hutton Settlement when I was 11 years old, along with three of my siblings, whose ages ranged from 5 years old to 13 years old at the time. After all that we had been through in those 3 years before Hutton, having been in four different foster homes and separated for 1 ½ of those years, The Hutton Settlement was a stark contrast to the lack of security we had experienced. My brothers lived in a separate home, or “cottage,” than me and my little sister on the Hutton campus but we saw each other every day. I excelled in school and made friends. I was given the stability and nurturance to move beyond a state of fear and helplessness for the first time in my life.


We went to school every day, had three meals a day and after school snacks, chores, study hours and tutors, caring Houseparents, and a community of support staff that want children to thrive. Hutton quickly became our home. We would visit our mom on weekends and holidays. After a year and a half, my mom was able to get clean, find a job and a home and was granted custody of me and my siblings. Initially, I, and my younger sister moved back with her, while my brothers chose to stay at Hutton. I spent about 6 months with my mother before returning to Hutton, I missed my friends, my school and my Hutton family. At Hutton, I discovered my passion for art and helping others. Our education coordinator at the time, along with some of the older campus youth started a community service group, called SALUTE or Service and Leadership United Through Education. I became a member of this group and regularly volunteered at various community organizations such as Campus Kitchens, Habitat For Humanity, Relay for Life through the American Cancer Society, Christmas Elf helpers for Santa Express, and we also held a clothing and toiletries drive for refugees in Spokane. I eventually became the president of SALUTE and had the opportunity to build a home for a family in Mexico through Amor Ministries as well as build a community garden on the Hutton campus. I learned the value of gratitude and giving back to the community. The staff at Hutton became my mentors, encouraging me to cultivate my voice and my passion for creating art and helping others heal. They modeled for me how to live with courage, discipline and compassion. They also helped me recognize my own resilience. I have had the opportunity to manage the yearly Hutton Christmas tree farm fundraiser for the past four years.


Though I lived at Hutton for six years of my life, my connection to Hutton I know will be lifelong. It is such a special and unique place that helps children who come from a broken past, journey toward wholeness. While not every child at Hutton has the same story, the Hutton Community works endlessly to provide each child opportunities and nurturing that will help them to be resilient. My heart is filled with gratitude to have had the experiences I have had, good and bad. I have learned so much from my Hutton family and mentors in my life, especially my mom. She fought her way through addiction and a traumatic past of her own and could have easily hardened herself to the cruelties of the world yet, remains a soft, empathic, and compassionate soul determined to help vulnerable and voiceless people find their voices and heal from trauma. I, now, have this same determination, having recently graduated with my BA in Psychology with an Art minor, to continue my education to attain a degree in Art Therapy. With this training, I hope to positively impact and foster healing and hope in the lives of children who have experienced abuse, trauma, and hopelessness. Having worked to have a healthy relationship with my mom, I, now, get privilege of watching her be an amazing parent and grandparent to my children. I, now, have the insight, support and personal resources that I need to break the cycle of abuse that my mother inherited. I, now, have the tools required to raise my two children in a nurturing environment. One in which they have unconditional love so that they can grow without fear of abandonment, in which they are taught courage, gratitude and compassion for all walks of life. My experiences thus far have taught me that home is not a place, but instead the people that nurture, comfort us, and provide the safety and security we need to grow and spread our branches. While, my early years did not provide me with a sense of home, I have since planted deep roots.

Hope & Wholeness: Jasmine’s Story

Hope & Wholeness: Jasmine’s Story

Growing up, I had no concept of home. We moved yearly, if not more frequently. Each year a different school and no prospect of making friends, why get close to anyone when you might not see them in a few months any way. My dad, although in mine and my brother’s life early on, was out of the picture by the time I was seven years old. Heroin, and the lifestyle that entailed, guided my mother’s choices and life for me and my four siblings was chaotic, unstable and completely out of our control. As a consequence of the lifestyle that she lived, we were put in situations that no child should have to experience. I was a voiceless shadow full of anger, fear, and hurt, I yearned for my mother’s love and attention but drugs and men consumed her.


My siblings and I stayed with my grandmother off and on. Sometimes my mother would show up with food, other times she would take us pan handling with her. We would sit on the street corner while she begged for money to feed us. Once she had enough, she would send us into the store to buy food and then make us eat it behind the store. When we were done she would have us come back to the street corner while she continued begging to feed her habit. Nothing was permanent.


We also lived with our grandfather for a short while. Living with my grandpa, I often  walked on egg shells, never knowing when my grandpa would explode in rage. I tip toed, trying not to anger him and spent my days playing with my cousins and siblings and hanging out in the library across the street. My mother showed up one day, with hopes to take my siblings and I away from our grandpa. Only I and my little sister ended up going with her. That first night we spent in a motel. We were awoken in the middle of the night to loud banging on the door, my grandpa had found us and was attempting to break down the door. We climbed out of the back window, climbed under fences and hid under bushes in the rain. The next morning we found that the tires had been slashed. We spent the next several days on the streets, eating at the mission and staying at drug houses.


My mom eventually got us all back and we moved to Spokane, I was 8 years old. Things seemed almost stable for a while. My mom was working even though she was still using drugs and her boyfriend was selling them. But we had a roof over our heads and I had just started third grade. One day at school, my two brothers and I got called to the counselor’s office. She told us that we would not be going home, Children’s Services placed my little sister and I in one foster home and my brothers in a separate home. I found out later that our house had been raided and my mom and her boyfriend were sent to jail. And just like that my whole world had been pulled out from under my feet, I was terrified. For some time my mom was not allowed visitation with my siblings and me. I remember just as school was getting out one day my mom showed up with a bag of toys, my foster parent quickly ushered me in the car and we drove away. I cried, not understanding why I could not see my mom. I prayed every night for God to help my mom get off of drugs and make us a family again.


Eventually, my siblings and I were placed in my grandma’s care. There, we basically had to fend for ourselves. My older brother and I did our best to feed ourselves and our two younger siblings. Our meals consisted of boxed mac n cheese, ramen noodles, and microwaved eggs. I remember on Thanksgiving, my grandpa sent us a pre-made Thanksgiving feast. My brother and I re-heated the food, and my siblings and I had our little Thanksgiving. We always looked forward to the first of the month because my grandma would treat us to dinner at a restaurant or buffet.Though we lived a block from our school, we would often stay home or be sent home because of head lice. Our grandma was ill and was not equipped to care for us. We were again placed in separate foster homes. My older sister and I were placed in one foster home, while my brothers and little sister were placed in another foster home that was out in the country. After my older sister ran away from the foster home we shared, I was placed in yet another home with an older couple. Although, these foster homes provided my siblings and I with the stability we needed, we were missing the emotional comfort of being together. I was alone and missed my brothers and sisters. I poured myself into school work because it was the one thing that I could control. I, eventually, was placed in the foster home in the country with three of my siblings, and transferred to another school. All the while my mom had finished a treatment program near Yakima and was being moved to another treatment program to begin the process of regaining custody. Our CPS worker told my mother about the Hutton Settlement and she fought to get us placed there, at the opposition of our Guardian Ad Litem, grandpa and foster parents, so that we could all be together and be near her.


I was placed at The Hutton Settlement when I was 11 years old, along with three of my siblings, whose ages ranged from 5 years old to 13 years old at the time. After all that we had been through in those 3 years before Hutton, having been in four different foster homes and separated for 1 ½ of those years, The Hutton Settlement was a stark contrast to the lack of security we had experienced. My brothers lived in a separate home, or “cottage,” than me and my little sister on the Hutton campus but we saw each other every day. I excelled in school and made friends. I was given the stability and nurturance to move beyond a state of fear and helplessness for the first time in my life.


We went to school every day, had three meals a day and after school snacks, chores, study hours and tutors, caring Houseparents, and a community of support staff that want children to thrive. Hutton quickly became our home. We would visit our mom on weekends and holidays. After a year and a half, my mom was able to get clean, find a job and a home and was granted custody of me and my siblings. Initially, I, and my younger sister moved back with her, while my brothers chose to stay at Hutton. I spent about 6 months with my mother before returning to Hutton, I missed my friends, my school and my Hutton family. At Hutton, I discovered my passion for art and helping others. Our education coordinator at the time, along with some of the older campus youth started a community service group, called SALUTE or Service and Leadership United Through Education. I became a member of this group and regularly volunteered at various community organizations such as Campus Kitchens, Habitat For Humanity, Relay for Life through the American Cancer Society, Christmas Elf helpers for Santa Express, and we also held a clothing and toiletries drive for refugees in Spokane. I eventually became the president of SALUTE and had the opportunity to build a home for a family in Mexico through Amor Ministries as well as build a community garden on the Hutton campus. I learned the value of gratitude and giving back to the community. The staff at Hutton became my mentors, encouraging me to cultivate my voice and my passion for creating art and helping others heal. They modeled for me how to live with courage, discipline and compassion. They also helped me recognize my own resilience. I have had the opportunity to manage the yearly Hutton Christmas tree farm fundraiser for the past four years.


Though I lived at Hutton for six years of my life, my connection to Hutton I know will be lifelong. It is such a special and unique place that helps children who come from a broken past, journey toward wholeness. While not every child at Hutton has the same story, the Hutton Community works endlessly to provide each child opportunities and nurturing that will help them to be resilient. My heart is filled with gratitude to have had the experiences I have had, good and bad. I have learned so much from my Hutton family and mentors in my life, especially my mom. She fought her way through addiction and a traumatic past of her own and could have easily hardened herself to the cruelties of the world yet, remains a soft, empathic, and compassionate soul determined to help vulnerable and voiceless people find their voices and heal from trauma. I, now, have this same determination, having recently graduated with my BA in Psychology with an Art minor, to continue my education to attain a degree in Art Therapy. With this training, I hope to positively impact and foster healing and hope in the lives of children who have experienced abuse, trauma, and hopelessness. Having worked to have a healthy relationship with my mom, I, now, get privilege of watching her be an amazing parent and grandparent to my children. I, now, have the insight, support and personal resources that I need to break the cycle of abuse that my mother inherited. I, now, have the tools required to raise my two children in a nurturing environment. One in which they have unconditional love so that they can grow without fear of abandonment, in which they are taught courage, gratitude and compassion for all walks of life. My experiences thus far have taught me that home is not a place, but instead the people that nurture, comfort us, and provide the safety and security we need to grow and spread our branches. While, my early years did not provide me with a sense of home, I have since planted deep roots.

Hutton Alum Back for Christmas Break

Today we’d like to spotlight Hutton alum Tim McPeak, who is back visiting for Christmas break!


Tim is attending the Curlew Job Corps, where he has chosen to pursue Cement Masonry. He will be receiving his certificate of completion this spring. To date, he has become OSHA certified, scaffolding and green certified and has learned skills to teach and train others in the field, much like a foreman.


What do you like about Job Corps?


“People there strive to do their best. You learn how to deal with different types of people every day. I appreciate that job corps allows me to complete drivers ed, receive certifications that will help me with my career and it teaches me how to work hard.”


Tim says that being a part of sports teams like track, cross country and basketball at West Valley High School helped him to learn how to work well with others and to help people achieve their goals. In high school, he lettered in track, cross country, basketball and football!

Tim also attended the Washington Youth Academy during his junior year of high school, where he earned high school credits in a military setting. He says he misses Youth Academy because he enjoyed the structure and routine environment – it made the days go by fast. He misses the people there as well.


What did you like about living at Hutton?


“I got to grow up with different age groups that taught me how to be patient. Hutton allowed me to grow up in a family environment, which I didn’t always have. One of my highlights was our 2015 Hutton trip to Disneyland.”


We asked him what he is looking forward to, once he completes Job Corps and he said having his own place, having money to buy things for himself, having the independence of growing up and most importantly, he’s looking forward to experiencing the world.

We can’t wait to see where Tim’s bright future takes him!

Campus Director David Milliken Receives National Mentoring Award

Hutton Settlement Children’s Home Campus Director, David Milliken, has been chosen to receive a national Excellence in Mentoring Award through MENTOR: The National Mentorship Partnership.


David has been announced as one of the nation’s four recipients of this distinguished honor and will accept his award in Washington, D.C. later this month to be recognized for his commitment to the children of Hutton Settlement and the Spokane community.


David was nominated by Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers last year. “It is incumbent upon each of us to be doing our part to make a positive impact in our community, and David is a perfect example of that here in Spokane,” said McMorris Rodgers. “Too many youth in our community face unimaginable hardships and often have no one to look to for advice, for an example, or for mentorship. But when they have no one to look to, people like David step up to serve as a positive and often life-changing force to help guide them along their journey. I want to thank David for his unwavering commitment to the Spokane community and to our area’s youth. Congratulations on this important and well-deserved honor!”


On behalf of the Hutton Board of Trustees, President Mary Kuney stated, “The Board is so proud of David for all of his dedicated work and compassion with the children of Hutton Settlement. His unique style in working with the children comes from continual learning of their needs and an innate ability to mentor. David is well deserving of this National Mentoring Award.”


David has truly shone as a mentor to our youth for the last 20 years.


His leadership inspires children to be changemakers within our community and he consistently and enthusiastically encourages youth to feel empowered, heard and loved. The majority of the children coming to Hutton have experienced severe trauma. David makes certain that every child coming through our doors is able to participate in activities that bring them joy, positive childhood memories and lifelong relationships. David’s goal is to transform the children in our care from receivers of services to givers of services by the time they graduate. We are honored to have David as an employee of Hutton Settlement and excited to see his efforts being recognized nationally. We’d also like to thank Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers for recognizing David’s service to the community by nominating him for this prestigious award.


Click here to read the article in the Spokesman Review.

Click here to read David’s full nomination.

Hutton Soccer Star Shines in Las Vegas Tournament

This past weekend, 8th grader Ty, who plays for the Washington East Premier 04 soccer team traveled with his team to Las Vegas to compete in “The City of Las Vegas Mayor’s Cup International Showcase”.


Hutton’s Executive Director, Chud Wendle’s son also plays for the team and Ty took the trip down with their family. The team is coached by Jason Sandobal.


The team went 3-and-1 and placed in a very competitive tournament, where hundreds of college coaches and recruiters were in attendance. Ty scored the winning goal in their second game, which put the team into the playoffs! Their only loss was to Crossfire, which is one of the top teams in the state of Washington. This tournament is one of the nation’s mainstage tournaments for soccer.


One of the best parts of the weekend, was when Ty’s friendship family, Tom, Jackie and their three daughters, surprised him by making the trip down to watch him play! They rooted Ty on at each game and we are so grateful for their love and support of Ty.


We’re so proud of all of Ty’s hard work and we know he has such a bright future!


Ty with his Hutton friendship family.